• One in Eight - the rate of Americans driving on a weekend night testing positive for an illicit drug. [Source: NHTSA]
    • Of the 16.3% of drivers positive for drugs, 11.3% were positive for illegal drugs, 3.9% for medications and 1.1% for both illegal drugs and medications. The most common illegal drugs were cannabis (8.6%), cocaine (3.9%) and methamphetamine (1.3%). [Source: NHTSA]
    • Approximately one in twelve high school seniors responding to the 2010 Monitoring the Future Study reported driving after smoking marijuana within two weeks prior to the survey interview. [Source: NIDA]
    • According to the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS), one in three (33%) of all drivers with known drug-test results who were killed in motor vehicle crashes in 2009 tested positive for drugs (illegal substances as well as over-the counter and prescription medications). [Source: NHTSA]
    • FARS data also showed the involvement of drugs in fatal crashes has increased by five percentage points over the past five years, even as the overall number of drivers killed in motor vehicle crashes in the United States has declined. [Source: NHTSA]
    • Approximately 34% of motor vehicle crash victims admitted to a Maryland trauma center tested positive for "drugs only" with about 16& testing positive for "alcohol only." Approximately 9.9% (or 1 in 10) tested positive for alcohol and drugs. 
    • According to the report: "State of Knowledge of Drug-Impaired Driving," drugs other than alcohol (e.g., marijuana and cocaine) are involved in about 18% of motor vehicle driver deaths. These other drugs are often used in combination with alcohol. [Source: NHTSA]
    • The 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health found an estimated 10.5 million people age 12 and older reported driving under the influence of illegal drugs during the year prior to being surveyed. [Source: SAMHSA]
    • 17 States have passed "per se" laws, in which it is illegal to operate a motor vehicle if there is any detectable level of a prohibited drug in the driver's blood. [Source: NHTSA]